Do you think the Buggery Law should be?

The Safe House Homeless MSM Project 2009 a detailed look & more



In response to numerous requests for more information on the defunct Safe House Pilot Project that was to address the growing numbers of displaced and homeless men in Kingston in 2007/8/9, a review of the relevance of the project and the possible avoidance of present issues with some of its previous residents if it were kept open.
Recorded June 12, 2013; also see from the former Executive Director named in the podcast more background on the project: HERE

Friday, September 21, 2012

Atheism, Secularism and Buggery ..............

0 comments


LGBT History on Tuesday September 18 was made with the above interview on TVJ's Religious Hardtalk when two activists who happen to also be atheists or secularist supporters appeared there. A pre-LGBT history month post of sorts however in days following one of the guests Javed Jaghai posted on his blog that Television Jamaica, TVJ erred and censored his comments on buggery.

See:

TVJ Censors Atheism Episode of Religious Hardtalk


The Jamaican media is not as free and fair as we would like to believe. A few weeks ago, I agreed to speak about atheism on Religions Hardtalk alongside Angeline Jackson. The host, Ian Boyne, had read a letter to the editor of The Gleaner in which I stated that I am gay and he asked whether I’d be comfortable speaking about my sexuality. We agreed that it wouldn’t be a talking point, but that if it became relevant I would not skirt around it.


In response to a question about the buggery law, I stated that as a gay Jamaican it is offensive to my being. Ian exclaimed that I was both an atheist AND gay in Jamaica, and we laughed then moved on.  The next day I emailed him asking for his assurance that our exchange concerning my sexuality would not be cut from the program. He said he did not intend to do so. In fact, he had instructed the editors to make it the promo.


Two hours before the program aired, I received an email from Ian informing me that the program was sanitized of my acknowledgement of my sexuality. I was told the editors were concerned for my safety, as he was initially, and that he did not fight for transparency. I was furious! Silence and invisibility does not protect minority groups from violence. It allows ignorance and prejudice to go unchallenged. How dare they insult me by telling me I’m being silenced for my own good. Tell that to someone with a less sophisticated understanding of social oppression.


TVJ has no qualms about inviting so-called “ex-gays” to speak about their turn from homosexuality through prayer and counseling. They eagerly obscure your face and distort your voice when you are speaking about molestation by (predatory) homosexuals and about your constant struggle to reject perverse sexuality.

You are to remain faceless! Furthermore, the station recklessly sensationalizes news stories dealing with homosexuals and homosexuality (HFLE anyone?).
Last summer, TVJ refused to air a PSA aimed at promoting tolerance for LGBT people. Kay Osbourne, the general manager at the time, justified the decision of the station by explaining their responsibility to respect the views and wishes of the majority. Editors there have NO understanding of how (by commission and by omission) they promote discourse that marginalizes homosexuals and makes violence against us permissible.


But I am to believe they are genuinely concerned about my safety. Because a yessideh mi bawn outa fimi madda woom.


The next day I received a tweet from a friend who lamented that he woke up to see the rebroadcast of the program at 10am but it did not air. I immediately emailed Ian, because I imagined my friend must have tuned in at the wrong time. Ian told me TVJ decided they would not show a repeat of the program. Since the most offensive bit of the interview was expunged by the editors, one can only assume the rest of the segment was also deemed objectionable.


On a program that seeks to explore diverse perspectives on religion, some views are obviously not welcome. TVJ allows you to use their platform if they can make a spectacle of your beliefs while affirming the supremacy of Christian theology. How dare someone not show reverence to God while unambiguously advocating for the subversion of Christian hegemony! What I find stunning about TVJ’s decision is that it illustrates a point I made during the show that the voices of atheists and secularists are actively suppressed in Jamaica.
I am now convinced TVJ is more interested in further institutionalizing Christianity than facilitating progressive dialogue about secularism, diversity and inclusion.

That said, I am surprised the station posted the episode on their website and I would not be surprised if it was pulled abruptly.

Here is my two cents some days before via another post


Thursday, September 20, 2012

Same gender loving women troubles ....................

0 comments

News has come that another member of the female same gender loving communities was brutally cut down in eastern Kingston at Dunoon Road on Tuesday September 18 around 6 or 7pm based on accounts from passers-by who are also members of the community who saw the cordoned crime scene and he nude body. The woman was reportedly seen nude running from her house at the time of the incident and several shots were heard later, when the heat cooled she was found lying in a pool of blood.

A bisexual theme seems to be the recurring decimal in this latest saga and community members in the nearby Rollington Town area have reported that the deceased was repeatedly warned about her involvement with a bisexual woman who also maintains a boyfriend. a series of very loud arguments have said to be the order or the day in recent times as the deceased demanded more time with her female partner. Meanwhile the boyfriend of the bisexual lover was allegedly livid at the fact that he was competing with a woman for his woman. Reports suggests friends had been heckling him for some time regarding the odd threesome and his switch-hitting girlfriend.

Another source in the area reported that the deceased was actually confronted by some friends of the boyfriend some time ago after an event in Rollington town's square where they supposedly warned her to stay clear of the female partner of their friend. 

Seeing this is bisexuality month as well the timing of this particular case brings into focus why we should discuss bisexual relations in a Jamaica caustic environment towards same gender love.



( L - R ) Phoebe Myrie. and Candice Williams 

It was in 2008 the gruesome double murder of the two photoed ladies due to a bisexual mix up as well where all the three persons were known to each other an excerpt of that story read as follows:

Although residents of Taylor Land expressed "mixed feelings" toward the alleged lesbian couple, they all concur that they were much more than friends. "Everybody know a two lesbian dem dat. U fi see how one a dem timid like gal, an di oda one guan like man ... The only time dem apart a when di Samantha (Candice) gu check har mother ina di morning," said a resident."Mi hear seh a lef one a dem lef her baby fada fi di nex uman, an tek di baby carry guh live," said another resident.
CHAT ROOMStatements given to the police by a relative of one of the deceased confirmed a lesbian affair between the two women, and explained the history of the affair, including the conflict over the child.According to the relative's report, the two young women met in a cellular 'chat room,' earlier in the year (when Candice was still living with the father of her child), adding that the common-law husband not only knew about the budding relationship, but actually encouraged it.The police document highlighted the temporary presence of a third woman at the house, but due to her alleged "nasty ways," she was soon asked to leave. It is also said that Myrie would go and stay with another female friend with whom she was also intimately involved.The statement indicated that Candice slowly progressed from a bi-sexual, to an outright lesbian, which led her to end the relationship with her common-law husband, who soon after, left the premises. The relative wrote that a conflict began when Candice decided to keep their child.

see more here: 

They Were Lesbians (Flashback)

10 months ago we lost two ladies as well one in Western Jamaica and the other in Kingston  over relationship matters, the accused was released as the prosecution's case was weak at the time for the latter victim, in fact an upcoming memorial is being planned by family members of which LGBT community members are invited to attend.

here is an audio I had done at the time:

also see the post from sister blog GLBTQJA: 

2 SGL Women lost, corrective rape & virtual silence from the male dominated advocacy structure



 

Western Jamaica

News also has come from St James regarding some same gender loving women facing some issues and a possible murder of another in the problematic Flankers area of Montego Bay.

Even in Portmore

It was reported earlier last month as well of an evasive move by a butch identified woman who resided in the Watson Grove area in St Catherine after she got a heads up from other men in the residential community to relocate as males living in the community were seemingly jealous of her ability to have all the "beautiful women" around her, a point that has been even penned in a rare anti lesbian dancehall song of which is hard to come by in recent times. The song questioned how was it that the butch lesbians were taking all the women that should be available for men. Since 2007 same gender loving women on a whole have been going through some warm times and butch identified lesbians in particular have been facing what seems to be unprecedented backlash from males when previously the "one of the boys" acceptance seems to be dying down. 

The rise in problems faced by lesbians be they butch identified or even so called femmes have been concentrated in Kingston, St Catherine and western Jamaica for now according to reports thus far, elsewhere might have other examples to report.

Portmore is not immune to homophobic and lesbophobic episodes especially in certain zones such as Gregory Park, Greater Portmore, Braeton, Edgewater, Waterford especially and Independence City, one can recall the infamous beating in that section of two males who resided together in a house as flatmates when community members suspected them as lovers. 
There are some women who present very masculine which also brings the question of identity and possible transgenderism as opposed to them being gay. The mimicking of the shotta mentality does not seem to be washing well with some males these days.

Sad to hear of these latest issues with our same gender loving sisters.

More updates to come where necessary.

Peace and tolerance

H

Dionne Jackson Miller on the controversial HFLE Curriculum Manual

0 comments
Radio Jamaica's Beyond The Headlines host Dionne Jackson Miller who was one of the first journalists to break the story on the Home & Family Life Education, HFLE Manual and the controversial parts that act as a self reporting mechanism on sexual orientation, HIV risk and other psycho sexual matters blogged recently on the issue, see below.

Also A must see - my take on the issue from Gay Jamaica Watch: Urgent need for sex & sexuality to be discussed nationally

Miss Jackson wrote: That Health and Family Life Education Manual – Bad Move!

Somebody messed up. Big time. This is not about being liberal, tolerant or open-minded. The people who managed to get what has turned out to be a hugely controversial Health and Family Life Education manual into Jamaican schools must have known that sections of the manual would be offensive to many Jamaican parents.

The manual, funded by UNICEF, is over 400 pages long, for Grades 7-9, and covers four themes, eating and fitness, managing the environment, self and interpersonal relationships and the one that has come in for criticism, sexuality and sexual health. The vast majority of the programme is uncontroversial, but some sections, dealing with sexuality, have raised concerns.

TVJ broke the story about some of the contents of the manual last week, which resulted in an immediate public backlash.

Within 24 hours of the story first airing, Education Minister Ronald Thwaites said that:

“I consider sections of the manual inappropriate for any age and certainly for the Grade 7 and 8 students for which it was designed. I have instructed that the material be withdrawn from all schools and re-written then redistributed…”

It doesn’t matter if you believe that the law making buggery a criminal offence should be repealed, or if you think Jamaican society is homophobic and more tolerance is needed (or not), or if you are a gay rights activist who wants to see same-sex marriage legalized at some point. That is really not what this is about.

It’s about trying to sneak a controversial curriculum into schools without the knowledge of most of the parents of the children in those schools. It’s about trying to force change in a way that is certain to bring a social backlash. It’s about being respectful enough of other people’s views to understand that whatever you think children ought to be taught, parents have a right to have a say in that decision. This is not just a desirable principle, it’s a legal requirement. Section 44 of our Education Act says:


In the exercise and performance of the functions assigned to him by this Act, the Minister shall have regard to the general principle that, so far as is compatible with the provision of efficient instruction and training, and the avoidance of unreasonable public expenditure, the wishes of parents are to be considered in the education of students.

I used the words “sneak a controversial curriculum into schools” quite deliberately. I don’t care who in the Education Ministry approved that manual, how much donor money was spent or that focus groups were involved. Anybody, and I mean any honest person, would have known that most Jamaican parents would have objected to sections of that manual. If you were serious about wanting buy-in, the controversial sections would have been published, widely disseminated and discussed in the media to truly gauge public and parental reaction. Any bets as to what the outcome would have been?

One of the most publicized aspects of the manual is the activity aimed at Grades 7 and 8 students with the stated objective of increasing ‘awareness of an individual’s personal risk of HIV infection.’ The questions include:

- Have you ever had sexual intercourse?

- Have you ever had sex without a condom?

- Have you ever had casual sexual partners?

- Have you ever had anal sex without a condom?

- Do you know your HIV status?

- Do you know the HIV status of all your partners?

Someone has just emailed me to point out that the activity is for the students to assess themselves, and that the answers are not meant to be shared with the teachers. So what happens when a teacher is inadvertently made privy to one of the answers? What if a child decides to share his or her experiences thinking the teacher can be trusted? Not all can. Also, are ordinary classroom teachers really equipped to handle the possible ramifications of raising some of these issues?

We hear a lot about children having sex at an early age. The 2008 Jamaica Reproductive Health Survey, conducted by the National Family Planning Board, indicates that 66% of young women and 75% of young men say they have had sex. These figures are actually a bit lower than those in the 2002 survey when 69% of young women and 82 % of young men reported having had sex. (Respondents were men aged 15-24, and women aged 15-49.)

In addition, the 2008 report stated that the mean age for first sexual encounter was 16.1 for young women, and 14.5 for young men, compared to 15.8 and 13.5, respectively, in 2002.

Twelve per cent of young women and 35% of young men reported having sex for the first time before they were 15.

Clearly this is cause for concern and must be addressed. A lot of young people are having sex. And inevitably, some of that sex is risky.


English: Adults and children estimated to be living with HIV in 2007. Source: WHO & UNAIDS (here) Ελληνικά: Ενήλικες και παιδιά που εκτιμάται ότι ζουν με τον ιό HIV το 2007. Πηγή: Παγκόσμιος Οργανισμός Υγείας & UNAIDS (εδώ) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Jamaica is one of seven out of ten Caribbean countries named by UNAIDS Caribbean on its website as having a prevalence rate for HIV of over 1%. The figure for Jamaica is 1.7%. UNAIDS says:


“When the HIV rate in the general population is higher than one percent this is defined as a general epidemic. That means that while communities with higher risk such as men who have sex with men and sex workers may contribute disproportionately to the spread of HIV, heterosexual transmission is also sufficient to sustain an epidemic independent of those groups.”

So most of us understand that young people must be given information about the dangers of early sexual activity and how to protect themselves when they start having sex. Advocates of the manual apparently think we don’t. That’s not it. But how far should schools go?

Look at the flip side. Eight out of ten of the girls and two out of every three boys would NOT have had sex in first and second form, which is the age group targeted by these activities in the family life manual. Does that really suggest that we need to have discussions about multiple sexual partners and anal sex with the class as a whole?

Is there a way to initiate introductory discussions about sex and risky sexual behavior without going into the kind of detail many parents have said they find offensive? Could we start the general discussions in class, but with a pointer to internet sites where sexually active students who have concerns can discreetly go to access the more detailed information they might need? Or find a way to involve parents in the process, by asking them to discuss sensitive information with their children? I know, I know, many parents are themselves ignorant, or uncomfortable discussing reproductive health issues. So how do we provide the information our young people clearly need without introducing topics that have been deemed unnecessary and inappropriate for others of the same age? After all, the statistics clearly show that not all teenagers are having sex. It’s a discussion we need to continue, until we find a generally acceptable solution.

Another offensive aspect of the manual for many people though, was its emphasis on sexual orientation which the manual rightly identifies as a “controversial topic.” I guess this is where I say “duh!”


English: Symbols for heterosexuality (middle), male homosexuality (upper right), male bisexuality (lower right), female homosexuality (lower left) and female bisexuality (upper left). Česky: Symboly pro heterosexualitu (uprostřed), mužskou homosexualitu (vpravo nahoře), mužskou bisexualitu (vpravo dole), ženskou homosexualitu (vlevo dole) a ženskou bisexualitu (vlevo nahoře). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Again, one can only wonder at the person who really thought it would be appropriate to include in an activities section for Grade Six students, a suggestion that “students volunteer for a panel discussion on the rights of homosexuals. The discussion focuses on the need to show tolerance and respect to all persons.”

The guided imagery activity for Grade 8, asking students to imagine a world where it was normal to be gay but where you, the students, were straight, was also problematic for a number of reasons.

For one thing, many people saw it as “conditioning” children to accept the gay lifestyle. In my view, the aim of the activity was clear, to try to have students walk in the shoes of a gay student and understand his/her feelings and problems a little more. But adapted as it was from a Toolkit by a group called Advocates for Youth to “create safe space for GLBTQ Youth,” this was an inherently wrong choice. NB – GLBTQ means Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Transgender and Questioning (I had to look up the Q!)

Advocates for Youth is a US-based organization which seems to carry out considerable work in the field of reproductive health education and advocacy for young people and describes itself, among other things, as an “innovator of new programs to redress homophobia and transphobia in communities of color.” That should have been a little red flag for people who wanted to borrow material for our purposes, shouldn’t it?

Another recent survey gives us a picture of current Jamaican attitudes to different sexual lifestyles.

The 2012 National Survey of Attitudes and Perceptions of Jamaicans Towards Same-Sex Relationships was recently released by the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals and Gays (J-FLAG), and was funded by AIDS-Free World.

The survey states that about 50% of respondents become aware of homosexuality by 14 years old, 88% felt male homosexuality was immoral, 83.7% felt female homosexuality was immoral, and 83.5% felt bisexuality was immoral.

When questioned, 76.7 percent of respondents did not want to see the buggery law amended, and 65% did not want the constitution amended to include specific reference to LGBT rights. However, 21.3% said they would support an amendment that would allow consensual sex between adults in private.

One reader commented that there was “extensive island-wide” consultation with stakeholders. If that is so, then the persons designing the field testing needs to revamp his or her methodology entirely, because it clearly was useless in gauging true public opinion on the most controversial issues.

Should tolerance be taught? I would say yes, absolutely, but there must be serious questions asked about the methodology which the Education Ministry chose to use here. The attempt by the people behind this manual to tackle this issue in the schools in the way we saw here was not just inadvisable, it was disrespectful as well.

People who are so quick to speak about the need to respect others, need to understand that respect works both ways. Parents’ wishes, much as you may disagree with them, must be respected as well. And if you have trouble accepting that, refer again to section 44 of the Education Act.
Related Posts with Thumbnails

Urgent Need to discuss sex & sexuality II

Following a cowardly decision by the Minister(try) of Education to withdraw an all important Health Family Life, HFLE Manual on sex and sexuality I examine the possible reasons why we have the homo-negative challenges on the backdrop of a missing multi-generational understanding of sexuality and the focus on sexual reproductive activity in the curriculum.

Newstalk 93FM's Issues On Fire: Polygamy Should Be Legalized In Jamaica 08.04.14



debate by hosts and UWI students on the weekly program Issues on Fire on legalizing polygamy with Jamaica's multiple partner cultural norms this debate is timely.

Also with recent public discourse on polyamorous relationships, threesomes (FAME FM Uncensored) and on social.

Some Popular Posts

Are you ready to fight for gay rights and freedoms?? (multiple answers are allowed)

Do you think effeminate men put themselves at risk by being "real" in public?

Did U Find This Blog Informative???

Blog Roll

What do you think is the most important area of HIV treatment research today?

Do you think Lesbians could use their tolerance advantage to help push for gay rights in Jamaica??

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide a 2009 Word focus report where the history of the major explosion of homeless MSM occurred and references to the party DVD that was leaked to the bootleg market which exposed many unsuspecting patrons to the public (3:59), also the caustic remarks made by former member of Parliament in the then JLP administration. The agencies at the time were also highlighted and the homo negative and homophobic violence met by ordinary Jamaican same gender loving men. The late founder of the CVC, former ED of JASL and JFLAG Dr. Robert Carr was also interviewed. At 4:42 that MSM was still homeless to 2012 but has managed to eek out a living but being ever so cautious as his face is recognizable from the exposed party DVD, he has been slowly making his way to recovery despite the very slow pace

Thanks for your Donations

Hello readers,

thank you for your donations via Paypal in helping to keep this blog going, my limited frontline community work, temporary shelter assistance at my home and related costs. Please continue to support me and my allies in this venture that has now become a full time activity. When I first started blogging in late 2007 it was just as a pass time to highlight GLBTQ issues in Jamaica under then JFLAG's blogspot page but now clearly there is a need for more forumatic activity which I want to continue to play my part while raising more real life issues pertinent to us.

Donations presently are accepted via Paypal where buttons are placed at points on this blog(immediately below, GLBTQJA (Blogspot), GLBTQJA (Wordpress) and the Gay Jamaica Watch's blog as well. If you wish to send donations otherwise please contact: glbtqjamaica@live.com




Activities & Plans: ongoing and future

  • To continue this venture towards website development with an E-zine focus

  • Work with other Non Governmental organizations old and new towards similar focus and objectives

  • To find common ground on issues affecting GLBTQ and straight friendly persons in Jamaica towards tolerance and harmony

  • Exposing homophobic activities and suggesting corrective solutions

  • To formalise GLBTQ Jamaica's activities in the long term

  • Continuing discussion on issues affecting GLBTQ people in Jamaica and elsewhere

  • Welcoming, examining and implemeting suggestions and ideas from you the viewing public

  • Present issues on HIV/AIDS related matters in a timely and accurate manner

  • Assist where possible victims of homophobic violence and abuse financially, temporary shelter(my home) and otherwise

  • Track human rights issues in general with a view to support for ALL

Thanks again
Mr. H

Tel: 1-876-8134942
lgbtevent@gmail.com








Peace

Information & Disclaimer

lgbtevent@gmail.com

Individuals who are mentioned or whose photographs appear on this site are not necessarily Homosexual, HIV positive or have AIDS.

This blog contains pictures that may be disturbing. We have taken the liberty to present these images as evidence of the numerous accounts of homophobic violence meted out to alledged gays in Jamaica.

Faces and names witheld for the victims' protection.

This blog not only watches and covers LGBTQ issues in Jamaica and elsewhere but also general human rights and current affairs where applicable.

This blog contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences.

If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please view labels, post list or exit.

Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics.

This blog is not designed to provide medical care, if you are ill, please seek medical advice from a licensed practioner

Thanks so much for your kind donations and thoughts.

As for some posts, they contain enclosure links to articles, blogs and or sites for your perusal, use the snapshot feature to preview by pointing the cursor at the item(s) of interest. Such item(s) have a small white dialogue box icon appearing to their top right hand side.


Recent Homophobic Incidents
CLICK HERE for related posts/labels and HERE from the gayjamaicawatch's BLOG containing information I am aware of. If you know of any such reports or incidents please contact lgbtevent@gmail.com

Peace to you and be safe out there.

Love.

What to do if you are attacked (News You Can Use)

First, be calm: Do not panic; it may be very difficult to maintain composure if attacked but this is important.

Try to reason with the attacker: Establish communication with the person. This takes a lot of courage. However, a conversation may change the intention of an attacker.

Do not try anything foolish: If you know outmanoeuvring the attacker is impossible, do not try it.

Do not appear to be afraid: Look the attacker in the eye and demonstrate that you are not fearful.

This may have a psychological effect on the individual.

Emergency numbers
The police 119

Kingfish 811

Crime Stop 311


Steps to Take When Contronted or Arrested by Police

a) Ask to see a lawyer or Duty Council

b) Only give name and address and no other information until a lawyer is present to assist

c) Try to be polite even if the scenario is tensed) Don’t do anything to aggravate the situation

e) Every complaint lodged at a police station should be filed and a receipt produced, this is not a legal requirement but an administrative one for the police to track reports

f) Never sign to a statement other than the one produced by you in the presence of the officer(s)

g) Try to capture a recording of the exchange or incident or call someone so they can hear what occurs, place on speed dial important numbers or text someone as soon as possible

h) File a civil suit if you feel your rights have been violatedi) When making a statement to the police have all or most of the facts and details together for e.g. "a car" vs. "the car" represents two different descriptions

j) Avoid having the police writing the statement on your behalf except incases of injuries, make sure what you want to say is recorded carefully, ask for a copy if it means that you have to return for it

Sexual Health / STDs News From Medical News Today

This Day in History