Do you think the Buggery Law should be?

The Safe House Homeless MSM Project 2009 a detailed look & more



In response to numerous requests for more information on the defunct Safe House Pilot Project that was to address the growing numbers of displaced and homeless men in Kingston in 2007/8/9, a review of the relevance of the project and the possible avoidance of present issues with some of its previous residents if it were kept open.
Recorded June 12, 2013; also see from the former Executive Director named in the podcast more background on the project: HERE

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

The Words of a Victim of Disrimination, JUNE 2008

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"In the first weeks of January two thousand and eight (2008) I was neglected by my family because they felt that I am not living in there eyes as the Christian believe and they strongly disagree that I cannot stay there anymore so immediately I have to dismiss the premises of my home and community,

It all started when my dad took away my phone and started on began to be inquisitive and saw things which contain my personal life and begin to act blusterous in a manner which he say that I should leave his house while I was in the back room he use a broom to hit me back on say that I should leave is house (Com out a mi hous an go live wit u dutty batty bwoy them, u nasty old reptile) and push me out of the house and through my thing out of the house and said that I should not come back and I must leave now, then went and started showing members of my family and community members my phone, to show that he has a prove to say that I am gay.

The members of the Church that I use to attend have all forsaken me and turn there backs as they don’t want any homosexual in there church as the bible does not support homosexuality.

The members of community are saying that they don’t want me in the community as I am a batty man and they don’t want no batty man in the community, and all batty boy fi dead.

Sence then I am in need of a place to live and I am also out of a Job."


Admin - one of our new cases that has been documented, a young man, 20 years old living in Western Jamaica, now finds himself staying with friends because his family wants nothing to do with him. Another typical case of a young gay man left to fend for himself.

Preventive detention wrong

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Dear Editor,
Preventive detention has existed in Jamaica for centuries. The colonial British, for example, detained thousands on plantations, in an effort to prevent them from exercising rights as human beings.
Since Jamaica's independence, we have had preventive detention in different forms for much the same reasons as in colonial times - to restrict rights of those deemed to have no rights in the first place.
Prime Minister Bruce Golding, supported by people such as Professor Don Robotham, seems to be planning to enshrine in law the practices that have exacerbated social divisions for the past 500 years. Preventive detention has for years followed a pattern that looks like this:
. The police raid a community and hold 30 to 100 or more youth. The police may know they are looking for someone called "Fishface", for example. However, they have no further information on this person, and no description.
. Most of the youth are released after "processing", but two or three are further detained.
. The police say the youth are detained in connection with "crimes committed in the parish", but provide relatives with no specifics on charges.
. Weeks or months pass during which the detainees remain in lock-up, often "awaiting identification parades".
. The detainees may face several identification parades till one is finally identified, usually on charges of illegal possession of a gun or ammunition.
. The detainee is transferred from the police lock-up to the Horizon Remand Centre. He remains there for two or three years while trial dates are deferred because no witnesses turn up in court, or no gun or ammunition is produced.
. At the end of the lengthy detention, the judge may throw out the case because of absence of evidence, or the detainee may be found guilty despite lack of evidence.
One of the effects of preventive detention is to tarnish an innocent youth's reputation and cause him to lose his job if he has been employed. Another effect is to convince a young offender that the police are not competent to ferret out his crimes, and that he can outsmart them because they seem too often to throw out a net and hope for an incidental catch.
Preventive detention had very limited impact on the plantation - lowering fear a bit between slave rebellions while increasing the hostility that arose from the social injustice in the first place. Some members of our present government have far more recent experiences of the trauma of preventive detention.
Hopefully, before our decision-makers yet again try to use gas to put out fires, they may realise the insanity of re-introducing past mistakes and expecting different results.

Yvonne McCalla Sobers
sobersy@yahoo.com

Sex, lies and videotapes....Interesting Piece

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Sex, lies and videotapes
Lloyd B Smith
Tuesday, June 24, 2008

"I did not have sexual intercourse with that woman." - Former United States President Bill Clinton during the heat of the Monica Lewinsky affair. The rest is history! Or his story?
The proposal that government should legalise prostitution then tax the proceeds of commercial sex workers has sparked much debate and controversy. Most stimulating if not titillating.......................
Interesting observation Mr. Smith

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Muzzled - Public officials face sanctions for unapproved utterances

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A NEW debate has emerged on whether public servants should be allowed to express a personal or professional view on an issue that may run counter to government policy......................

Click the post title for the full Gleaner article or
HERE

Why does Mr. Golding thinks he has to to be this moral kingpin for everyone is there some deeper or other reasons for this particular attack it seems on the good Dr.?
It is not the first time that an official from the Ministry of Health has expressed views on decriminalizing Commercial sex work but it has never garnered such a quick and tersely worded response, who the hell Bruce Golding thinks he is. Do what you were put there to do and stop meddling in Ministry affairs let the relevant people see it fit to sanction where sanctioning is required.
Is he afraid that if the commercial sex workers acts are decriminalized that gays will join in next for the cry, he is late that cry has been out there and since the formation of JFLAG it has gotten louder and more organized.
Face up Prime Minister it takes all kinds to make the world go round your dream of being this all righteous Moses, just forget it.
So if an official sees something that can be changed then they can't speak out.............is wah dis?
then we talk about a democracy..........a joke wi a joke, wi nuh ready yet
Damn you.......looking to gain political mileage at any cost, hmph!


Howie seh so.............one luv

The Gay Ad that Heinz Pulled..........what u think???

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The Gay Ad that Heinz Pulled..........what u think???

Detain us, if you can, Interesting piece

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Detain us, if you can
published: Tuesday June 24, 2008

by Vernon Daley

The police force, perhaps unwittingly, has given the best argument against the much talked about proposal for 'preventive detention'.

Last week, the police released the names of 77 of the most wanted men in Kingston and St. Andrew alone. That's a whole lot of wanted men walking about free among us, and when we consider that these fellows are drawn from only two parishes, the figure is even more alarming. Some 36 of those men are said to have committed dangerous gun crimes since the start of the year while the remaining 41 are wanted for crimes committed last year.

CLICK THE POST TITLE FOR THE FULL STORY

or HERE


An oldie but what u think ...............No to JFLAG intimidation

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No to JFLAG intimidation
published: Friday February 8, 2008

The Editor, Sir:

I do not condone violence of any kind. However, I must comment on the letter 'Govt urged to support JFLAG', published on Thursday. Jamaica isn't Canada, neither England nor the USA. We wish to differ from all European practices of morality. We will not be intimidated by special interest groups from the outside, trying to twist our arms. That is what the homosexual movement is trying to do, imposing their will on the rest of the world.

There is no such thing as trans-sexuals. No scientist can change the sex or gender of a person. Our sex and gender are determined by our sex chromosomes, not our anatomy. Men have XY chromosomes and women XX. Stop the deception. Satan used the same kind of deception on Adam and Eve. Rights groups, mind your own business.

Jamaica and other countries that do not accept the homosexual lifestyle will be like this forever. Stop imposing your will (values and morals) on us. We are Jamaicans, we love everyone, but we will not sell out our moral principles to pagans.

What next, appeal to the govern-ment to take prayer out of schools? Give me a break!

I am, etc.,

BRUCE GAYLE

brcygyl2@yahoo.com

Interesting .....................Balance of probabilities for release of prisoner

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House of Lords

Published June 24, 2008

Life Sentence Review Commissioners v D

Before Lord Bingham of Cornhill, Lord Scott of Foscote, Lord Carswell, Lord Brown of Eaton-under-Heywood and Lord Neuberger of Abbotsbury

Speeches June 11, 2008

The standard of proof to be established when the Life Sentence Review Commissioners were considering whether a prisoner who had served his tariff was no longer a risk to the public was the balance of probabilities.

The House of Lords so held, allowing an appeal by the commissioners from the Court of Appeal of Northern Ireland (Lord Kerr, Chief Justice, Lord Justice Campbell and Lord Justice Higgins) (\ NI CA 33) who allowed the appeal of D from the dismissal by Mr Justice Girvan in the High Court of Northern Ireland (\ NI QB 33) of his application for judicial review of the commissioners’ decision not to release him on licence.

Mr John Larkin, QC and Mr Donald Sayers for the commissioners; Mr Gerald Simpson, QC and Mr Desmond Hutton for D; Mr Paul Maguire, QC and Mr David Scoffield for the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, as intervener.

LORD CARSWELL said that the applicant was convicted in 1982 of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment. He was released on licence in April 1996.

On March 5, 1997, he was arrested in consequence of an allegation by his niece, G, then aged 13, of buggery, indecent assault and gross indecency. On March 7, 1997 his licence was revoked by the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Further allegations were made by G’s younger sister, L, and charges were brought against the applicant in respect of G’s complaint. Those charges were withdrawn by the Director of Public Prosecutions on January 1998, apparently on the ground that it was not in the best welfare interests of the girls to require them to give evidence.

The applicant remained in prison and his suitability for release received periodic consideration. The Life Sentence Review Board declined to recommend his release, on the ground that they considered that he had committed the offences of which his nieces had complained and there was a continuing risk that he might commit further similar offences if released.

The Life Sentences (Northern Ireland) Order (SI 2001 No 2564 (NI 2)) came into force on October 8, 2001 and the commissioners were appointed to advise the secretary of state on the release or recall of life prisoners.

A panel of commissioners considered the complaints made by G and L. Both had been interviewed by social workers and the interviews recorded on video which the panel viewed. The panel received evidence from police officers, social workers, a forensic scientist, psychologists, the probation service and a prison governor.

The applicant gave evidence on his own behalf and called witnesses in his support. Neither G nor L was called to give evidence.

The panel was satisfied on the balance of probabilities that the applicant sexually abused both G and L. The panel then considered the element of risk of the applicant committing further serious harm if released and decided that he should not be released at that stage.

The main subject of the appeal was the standard of proof applicable in such cases. Only two standards were recognised by the common law: proof on the balance of probabilities and proof beyond reasonable doubt. The latter standard was that required by the criminal law and in such areas as contempt of court and disciplinary proceedings brought against members of a profession. The former was that standard applicable to all other civil proceedings.

It was quite apparent that the panel had devoted very careful and anxious attention to the question. They went about their task in the proper manner. The evidence against the applicant was clear and cogent and pointed very strongly to the conclusion reached by the panel.

Lord Brown delivered a concurring speech; Lord Bingham, Lord Scott and Lord Neuberger agreed with Lord Carswell.

Solicitors: Cleaver Fulton Rankin, Belfast; Madden & Finucane, Belfast; Treasury Solicitor.

Monday, June 23, 2008

Advocates for Youth International Youth Leadership Council

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By Dwayne Brown
Advocates for Youth International Youth Leadership Council, APRIL 2008

"We don't know who to trust...only your 'best friend' knows your secret and only he/she can reveal it" said Bob Marley, a renowned reggae artist. Politicians, health care providers, guidance counselors, teachers, parents and pastors--are these individuals truly our 'best friends'?
In Jamaica, HIV/AIDS has become an irreversible, non-competitive inhibitor to the standard of living, social viability, and ecology of the body and composure of young people regardless of sexuality, ethnicity, class, race, or culture. Even at present, the thought of being infected scares me. The reality for my friend was different. An intelligent young man, who was ready to take on the world, never knew what was in store for him around the corner. On July 15, 2004, his exuberance, dreams and aspirations were robbed by his aggressors who raped him at the age of 18. Four months later he was diagnosed with HIV.

According to the UNAIDS 2006 HIV/AIDS statistics, throughout the world, almost 6,000 youth ages 15 to 24 are infected with HIV every day. What does this statistic portray about the young people of the world? Far too often we are uneducated and mislead by our parents and the leaders of our society about sexuality, sexual intercourse, and HIV/AIDS. Furthermore, Jamaica is seen as a Christian country, yet the churches fail to educate the young people within their congregation and surrounding communities about HIV/AIDS. As a result, we are not informed about how to make right and responsible decisions about our sexual health and we become more vulnerable and susceptible to sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.

The proliferation of HIV/AIDS among Jamaica's young people is alarming. Being sexually active is common among our peers. I can vividly recall the silence around discussing sex and sexuality issues in school and church. It was in 1999, my final year in junior high school, when almost all the girls that I had grown up with in school had dropped out because of pregnancy. Who are we to blame?

Contemporary Jamaican society is one of disparity, confusion, and obscurity. The government has said that youth are the priority of the nation, but clearly we are not number one among the long list of government priorities. The breach of confidentiality by health care providers and the lack of youth-friendly services is a crucial concern among young people. The fear of the repercussions of being stigmatized and discriminated against is reflected in the young people’s reluctance to seek health care.

Although the Jamaican National HIV/AIDS policy's non-discrimination clause states "In respect for human rights and dignity of persons infected or affected by HIV/AIDS, there should be no discrimination against workers on the basis of real or perceived HIV status," this is not the reality in practice in the Jamaican work environment.
Homophobia also plays a detrimental role once you are perceived as a 'batty man,' or gay, by wider society. Research indicates that homophobia in Jamaica is a powerful cultural influence which forces HIV/AIDS infected and affected young gay men from accessing medical care. I strongly believe that the political and wider Jamaican society needs to reform its approach to homosexuality in order to reduce the HIV transmission rate among young gay men.
When I look within my society, I see a lack of unity and a lack of understanding of the immense amount of struggles and suffering young people undergo. Which leads back to the question, "Where are our best friends?"

Recent Homophobic Attack, June - Men chased from home in St. Catherine

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On May 25 of this year two males were attacked at their home caused by a rumour started by a "female friend" who deliberately incited one against the other, as it turned out an argument developed between the two males, it was at this time that this "female friend" called attention to them and a mob who descended on the boys.

They both sustained injuries with one as shown above with his right leg broken and scratches and bruises and the left finger of the other sprained.

The matter was reported to the Police with select Officers being very cooperative while others were open with scaving remarks and one male officer demanded the boys leave the station.

However the "Professional officers" saw to it that the matter was dealt with and the victims left the station without fear. Thanks officers.

Thanks especially to a woman constable who shall remain nameless who has asked us to keep her abreast of the boys situation, she has left her personal cell number.

A special thank you to a former JFLAG Crisis Intervention Officer who has sheltered the boys in her own home and has promised to do so until they can fully get back on their feet. Of note JFLAG decided not to intervene in this matter as the boys were deemed trouble makers since they had problems in their relationship which sometimes led to fights. I was troubled by this decision however as I was of the opinion that the organization was to serve the community.
Is JFLAG now involved in bigotry and discrimination itself too? Very selective it seems in offering assistance.

The broken legged victim has since had the cast removed and he has returned to his job as a landscaper, while the other is job hunting.

UPDATE: Oct 7, 2009 - both men have moved on and have separated but have found employment and housing with some help from friends and the above mentioned crisis intervention Officer.
Peace
H

One Love? Try NO Love for The Kids: Gay Hate In Jamaica!

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Found this comment on a blog from wordpress, thanks for the interest my friend and a very good blog. ONE LUV..................



Dear Friends:


I found this disturbing piece (located on 365Gay.com) about the rampant gay hate in Jamaica.


Personally, I believe that all gays, and gay allies, should protest Jamaica. Wait, scratch that…Anyone who believes in the civil rights of their fellow human beings, whether you agree with homosexuality or not, should protest the entire country. This is deplorable. First world tourists should show anti-gay Jamaicans that homophobia of this magnitude cannot be tolerated, under any circumstances. The Jamaican economy is based on tourism. Without tourists the already 3rd world country would crash and burn. So hit them where it hurts, in the wallet.


After reading this I have decided that I’ll NEVER support anything Jamaica does, ever, until the laws are changed.


Read on… HERE



Poll: 70 Percent In Jamaica Oppose Any Rights For Gays
by 365Gay.com Newscenter Staff Posted: June 20, 2008 - 5:00 pm ET (Kingston)


There is little chance laws against homosexuality will be repealed in Jamaica if a public opinion poll released Friday is any indication. The survey found that 70 percent of Jamaicans do not believe gays and lesbians should have any civil rights. The poll, taken for the Jamaican Gleaner newspaper, found women slightly more receptive than men to repealing the sodomy law or giving gays protection from discrimination in housing or work. 


Thirty-four percent of women would support pro-gay legislation, while only 20 percent of men would. Jamaican gays, supported by international human rights groups, have been calling for repeal of the sodomy law which carries a sentence of 10-years in prison on conviction. 


Last month Prime Minister Bruce Golding condemned Britain and other Commonwealth countries for criticizing the treatment of gays in the Caribbean nation. ”Jamaica is not going to allow values to be imposed on it from outside,” he said during an interview broadcast on the BBC..........................................

How To Use a Dildo for Strap-on Sex for Lesbians

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How To Use a Dildo for Strap-on Sex
From Kathy Belge,
Your Guide to Lesbian Life.


Lesbians who like penetration may want to try a dildo for strap-on sex.

Here are some tips for great sex with a dildo or strap-on.

Difficulty: Average
Time Required: An evening
Here's How:Find the right dildo.

Here are some tips for buying the right dildo for your needs.

So you and your partner have decided to introduce a dildo, or strap-on to your sexual repertoire. If you've never used one before, it can be hard to know where to begin. Here's some advice to get you started.
Time Required: A few hours
Here's How:
  1. Decide how big a dildo you want. Dildos come in a variety of sizes. Experiment with how deep and wide you like penetration. You can use your fingers as a guide.
  2. Choose which material will work best for you. Many dildos are made of silicone because it retains body heat and is easy to clean. Less expensive models are made of rubber. If you are a first-timer, you may want to start with a less expensive rubber model. I would not recommend glass or lucite for your first dildo.
  3. To harness or not? You can use a dildo with an harness or hold it in your hand. A harness leaves your hands free, but will take an additional chunk out of your wallet. If money is a concern, you may choose to wait on the harness and experiment with hand holding it.
  4. Pick your store. If you have one steady partner, the two of you may wish to shop together for your new toy. You're likely to feel more comfortable in a store that caters to women. You can make your purchse on-line, but you may prefer to visit a store in person where you can touch and feel the different models.
  5. If you decide to buy a harness, the most important feature is comfort. Some fit like a g-string and others wrap around your butt cheeks like a jock strap. Another type straps around your thigh. Choose which you think will be the most comfortable for you.
  6. Go home and enjoy. But don't forget to practice Safer Sex.

Get used to your new toy. Put on your harness and dildo and get used to how it feels before jumping right into bed with your partner. Have her help you into the harness. The tighter it is, the more control you will have and the more sensation you will feel.Don't forget foreplay. Kiss her. Touch her. Get her excited and turned on before you penetrate.Put a condom on your dildo and use plenty of lube, even if she seems lubricated.
Slippery and wet is much more enjoyable.Go slow and easy the first time. Angle your dildo upwards, not back toward her spine. Let your partner guide you in how fast, slow, deep, rough or easy you go.Try different positions. Old fashioned missionary position allows for face to face intimacy. Doggy-style allows you to penetrate further inside her.Use your hands.

Remember the foreplay? Keep at it, caressing her where she likes it most.Mix it up. Experiment with oral sex. Watching their lover go down on a dildo is a big turn on for many dykes. If you want to experiment with anal penetration, take it slow and easy and use lots of lube. Remember to change condoms any time you change orifices.

Communication is key. As with any sex, talking about what you like, don't like, what you want, what feels good is very important. Listen and pay attention to her body language. Ask her if it feels good. Does she want it deeper, faster, slower?Remember if you share any sex toy, to change the condom!

Peace and tolerance

H

Egale Canada and the Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention recognize leaders in the fight for human rights

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Egale Canada and the Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention recognize leaders in the fight for human rights
Toronto, Ontario – Egale Canada and the Black Coalition for AIDS Prevention (Black CAP) held a joint fundraising event called Unified Voices: Celebrating Black, African, Caribbean Leadership on June 17th, 2008.
This fundraising event recognized leading voices in the fight against homophobia/transphobia and HIV/AIDS in Canada’s Black, African and Caribbean communities. The evening will highlight the work of two leaders in this fight: Gareth Henry, the International Grand Marshal of Pride 2008, and Zanele Muholi, a leading South African activist.

Gareth Henry is the Co-Chair and Program Manager of J-FLAG , the Jamaica Forum for Lesbians, All-Sexuals and Gays, and a recipient of both the 2006 Human Rights Watch Award and the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network Award. He took over the reins of J-FLAG from Brian Williamson when the latter was murdered and mutilated as a result of a homophobic attack in 2004. Gareth’s leadership in Jamaica coupled with his status as the 2008 International Grand Marshal allow him to highlight the oppression in his home country while stressing the need for Canadians to rally against homophobia not only abroad but in communities across the country.

Zanele Muholi, born in Umlazi, Durban, is an emerging, yet already internationally recognized photographer and activist. She’s the co-founder of the Forum for the Empowerment of Women (FEW), a black lesbian organization based in Johannesburg. Her work represents the black female body in frank yet intimate ways and challenges the portrayal of black women’s bodies in documentary photography. Zanele’s solo exhibition Only half the picture, which showed at Capetown South Africa’s Michael Stevenson Gallery in March 2006, has travelled to the Market Photo Workshop in Johannesburg and the Afrovibes Festival in Amsterdam.

She is the recipient of both the 2005 Tollman Award for the Visual Arts and the first BHP Billiton/Wits University Visual Arts Fellowship in 2006. Zanele has recently moved to Toronto to pursue her Master of Fine Arts degree in Documentary Media at Ryerson University.
Unified Voices also included performances by legendary drag impersonator Michelle Ross, who, as 30-year veteran of the profession, has been a pioneer for black drag artists in Toronto. Music by DJ Jamal rounded out the evening.

Black CAP (http://www.black-cap.com/) is an organization that works to reduce HIV/AIDS in Toronto’s Black, African, and Caribbean communities to enhance the quality of life of Black people living with or affected by HIV/AIDS. The agency is a non-profit, volunteer-driven, community service organization that gives support to those infected and affected by HIV/AIDS and raises awareness of the impact of HIV/AIDS and STIs in Toronto.

Egale Canada advances equality and justice for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans-identified people and their families across Canada. Egale also hosts Stop Murder Music (Canada), which advocates against anti-gay lyrics targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and trans-identified communities.
Related Posts with Thumbnails

Urgent Need to discuss sex & sexuality II

Following a cowardly decision by the Minister(try) of Education to withdraw an all important Health Family Life, HFLE Manual on sex and sexuality I examine the possible reasons why we have the homo-negative challenges on the backdrop of a missing multi-generational understanding of sexuality and the focus on sexual reproductive activity in the curriculum.

Newstalk 93FM's Issues On Fire: Polygamy Should Be Legalized In Jamaica 08.04.14



debate by hosts and UWI students on the weekly program Issues on Fire on legalizing polygamy with Jamaica's multiple partner cultural norms this debate is timely.

Also with recent public discourse on polyamorous relationships, threesomes (FAME FM Uncensored) and on social.

Some Popular Posts

Are you ready to fight for gay rights and freedoms?? (multiple answers are allowed)

Do you think effeminate men put themselves at risk by being "real" in public?

Did U Find This Blog Informative???

Blog Roll

What do you think is the most important area of HIV treatment research today?

Do you think Lesbians could use their tolerance advantage to help push for gay rights in Jamaica??

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide a 2009 Word focus report where the history of the major explosion of homeless MSM occurred and references to the party DVD that was leaked to the bootleg market which exposed many unsuspecting patrons to the public (3:59), also the caustic remarks made by former member of Parliament in the then JLP administration. The agencies at the time were also highlighted and the homo negative and homophobic violence met by ordinary Jamaican same gender loving men. The late founder of the CVC, former ED of JASL and JFLAG Dr. Robert Carr was also interviewed. At 4:42 that MSM was still homeless to 2012 but has managed to eek out a living but being ever so cautious as his face is recognizable from the exposed party DVD, he has been slowly making his way to recovery despite the very slow pace

Thanks for your Donations

Hello readers,

thank you for your donations via Paypal in helping to keep this blog going, my limited frontline community work, temporary shelter assistance at my home and related costs. Please continue to support me and my allies in this venture that has now become a full time activity. When I first started blogging in late 2007 it was just as a pass time to highlight GLBTQ issues in Jamaica under then JFLAG's blogspot page but now clearly there is a need for more forumatic activity which I want to continue to play my part while raising more real life issues pertinent to us.

Donations presently are accepted via Paypal where buttons are placed at points on this blog(immediately below, GLBTQJA (Blogspot), GLBTQJA (Wordpress) and the Gay Jamaica Watch's blog as well. If you wish to send donations otherwise please contact: glbtqjamaica@live.com




Activities & Plans: ongoing and future

  • To continue this venture towards website development with an E-zine focus

  • Work with other Non Governmental organizations old and new towards similar focus and objectives

  • To find common ground on issues affecting GLBTQ and straight friendly persons in Jamaica towards tolerance and harmony

  • Exposing homophobic activities and suggesting corrective solutions

  • To formalise GLBTQ Jamaica's activities in the long term

  • Continuing discussion on issues affecting GLBTQ people in Jamaica and elsewhere

  • Welcoming, examining and implemeting suggestions and ideas from you the viewing public

  • Present issues on HIV/AIDS related matters in a timely and accurate manner

  • Assist where possible victims of homophobic violence and abuse financially, temporary shelter(my home) and otherwise

  • Track human rights issues in general with a view to support for ALL

Thanks again
Mr. H

Tel: 1-876-8134942
lgbtevent@gmail.com








Peace

Information & Disclaimer

lgbtevent@gmail.com

Individuals who are mentioned or whose photographs appear on this site are not necessarily Homosexual, HIV positive or have AIDS.

This blog contains pictures that may be disturbing. We have taken the liberty to present these images as evidence of the numerous accounts of homophobic violence meted out to alledged gays in Jamaica.

Faces and names witheld for the victims' protection.

This blog not only watches and covers LGBTQ issues in Jamaica and elsewhere but also general human rights and current affairs where applicable.

This blog contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences.

If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please view labels, post list or exit.

Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics.

This blog is not designed to provide medical care, if you are ill, please seek medical advice from a licensed practioner

Thanks so much for your kind donations and thoughts.

As for some posts, they contain enclosure links to articles, blogs and or sites for your perusal, use the snapshot feature to preview by pointing the cursor at the item(s) of interest. Such item(s) have a small white dialogue box icon appearing to their top right hand side.


Recent Homophobic Incidents
CLICK HERE for related posts/labels and HERE from the gayjamaicawatch's BLOG containing information I am aware of. If you know of any such reports or incidents please contact lgbtevent@gmail.com

Peace to you and be safe out there.

Love.

What to do if you are attacked (News You Can Use)

First, be calm: Do not panic; it may be very difficult to maintain composure if attacked but this is important.

Try to reason with the attacker: Establish communication with the person. This takes a lot of courage. However, a conversation may change the intention of an attacker.

Do not try anything foolish: If you know outmanoeuvring the attacker is impossible, do not try it.

Do not appear to be afraid: Look the attacker in the eye and demonstrate that you are not fearful.

This may have a psychological effect on the individual.

Emergency numbers
The police 119

Kingfish 811

Crime Stop 311


Steps to Take When Contronted or Arrested by Police

a) Ask to see a lawyer or Duty Council

b) Only give name and address and no other information until a lawyer is present to assist

c) Try to be polite even if the scenario is tensed) Don’t do anything to aggravate the situation

e) Every complaint lodged at a police station should be filed and a receipt produced, this is not a legal requirement but an administrative one for the police to track reports

f) Never sign to a statement other than the one produced by you in the presence of the officer(s)

g) Try to capture a recording of the exchange or incident or call someone so they can hear what occurs, place on speed dial important numbers or text someone as soon as possible

h) File a civil suit if you feel your rights have been violatedi) When making a statement to the police have all or most of the facts and details together for e.g. "a car" vs. "the car" represents two different descriptions

j) Avoid having the police writing the statement on your behalf except incases of injuries, make sure what you want to say is recorded carefully, ask for a copy if it means that you have to return for it

Sexual Health / STDs News From Medical News Today

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