Do you think the Buggery Law should be?

The Safe House Homeless MSM Project 2009 a detailed look & more



In response to numerous requests for more information on the defunct Safe House Pilot Project that was to address the growing numbers of displaced and homeless men in Kingston in 2007/8/9, a review of the relevance of the project and the possible avoidance of present issues with some of its previous residents if it were kept open.
Recorded June 12, 2013; also see from the former Executive Director named in the podcast more background on the project: HERE

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month: Prostate Cancer Risks, Anal Sex Separate Yet Intertwined Issues For MSMs

2 comments
This article is written and put together in the attempt to dispel the popular myth that anal sex can be a cause of prostate cancer. 

Anal sex does not cause prostate cancer, nor will it cause it to come back.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness month locally and there has been some talk that anal sex especially as practised by same gender loving men who play the passive role in their sexual encounters or relationships are likely to suffer from prostate cancer. This is a myth, Prostate cancer is usually one of the slower growing cancers. In the past, it was most frequently encountered in men over 70, and many of those men died of other causes before their prostate cancer could kill them. This led to the old saying &ldquomost men die with, not of, prostate cancer&rdquo. However, that is certainly is not true today. Three developments have changed things considerably:
  • Men are living longer, giving the cancer more time to spread beyond the prostate, with potentially fatal consequences.
  • More men in their early sixties, fifties and even forties are being detected with prostate cancer. Earlier on-set, combined with the greater male life expectancy, means those cancers have more time to spread and become life-threatening unless diagnosed and treated.
  • Prostate cancer in younger men often tends to be more aggressive and hence more life-threatening within a shorter time.
Provided appropriate treatment commences while the cancer is still confined to the prostate gland, it is possible to "cure" it. The possibility of cure is the main reason why early diagnosis is critical

What is it?

The walnut-sized prostate gland is located in front of the rectum and below the bladder. Its main job is to produce the fluid that nourishes and protects sperm cells. anatomy.jpg 
 (scroll over image to veiw the prostate. Image taken from http://www.prostate.org.au/what-is-the-prostate.php) The most common form of prostate cancer develops in the glandular cells. While most prostate cancers grow very slowly, if it's an aggressive form, it can quickly spread to the area surrounding the prostate, and eventually metastasize to the lymph nodes, lungs, liver, and other parts of the body.

What is it about the prostate that causes so much pleasure with anal sex?

The prostate is a very sensitive gland or organ that resides between the rectum and the bladder. There are nerve endings in the prostate which connect to the base of the spinal cord and directly to the brain. Stimulation of the prostate with a finger, dildo, penis or other sex toy can be very pleasurable. The use of adequate water-based lubrication and a condom on an erect penis can increase the pleasure to the receptive partner.

Who is at risk?

Your chances of developing prostate cancer have a lot to do with factors you can't control, like age and family history. Some doctors believe that having a vasectomy can also increase the risk, but the medical community is divided on the issue. Some of the known risk factors include:
  • Age: The risk of prostate cancer increases as you get older. All men should be aware of their risk of the disease and consider being tested for it regularly from age 50 onwards, or from 40 onwards if there is a family history of prostate cancer.
  • Race: The reason is a mystery, but prostate cancer is more likely to occur in Afro-American and Hispanic men, who are more than twice as likely to die of the disease than their Anglo-Saxon counterparts. The occurrence of the cancer is lower in Asian men.
  • Family history: Having an immediate family member who has suffered from prostate cancer more than doubles your risk of eventually contracting it.
  • Diet: Eating an abundance of red meat and high-fat dairy products may increase your risk of prostate cancer.
Some doctors think that a condition known as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, or PIN, can be an important indicator of whether or not you will develop prostate cancer. PIN refers to tiny changes in the size and shape of prostate gland cells, and can appear in men as young as 20. A high-grade PIN on a prostate biopsy may or may not indicate the presence of cancer, but your doctor will definitely want to keep regular tabs on your prostate if a high number is discovered.

What are the common reasons to get tested?

Most men will seek testing for prostate cancer for the following reasons:
  • As part of a general check up - usually after 50 years of age
  • Due to a recent experience with a relative or friend who has suffered from prostate cancer
  • A family history of prostate cancer
  • A recent onset of urinary symptoms
Speak with your doctor and make up your own mind in regards to testing. Some men, when enquiring about prostate cancer, may be confused by conflicting views expressed about methods of diagnosing and treating the disease. Perhaps the most controversial is the view - which PCFA disputes absolutely - that it would be better for men not to know whether they have the disease and therefore they should not be tested be treated. The thinking behind this is:
  • because the disease can be relatively slow to develop, most men would die with, rather than of, the disease.
  • because treatment has potentially serious side effects such as impotence and incontinence, treatment may be worse than the disease
All men have the right to make decisions for themselves about whether to be tested. It is your choice.

What are the symptoms?

Many cases of prostate cancer are slow-growing and symptom-free. That said, some men do experience symptoms like difficulty urinating, a weaker urine stream, pain or burning while urinating or ejaculating, dribbling after urination, and stubborn hip or back pain. If you experience any of these symptoms, it's important to see your doctor immediately.

How is it detected?

If you're in a high-risk category, regular screening can help spot the cancer early on. Prostate cancer can be found in two ways: A doctor can test the amount of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood or conduct a digital rectal exam. A digital rectal exam is pretty much what it sounds like. The doctor inserts a finger into your rectum to manually check for any irregularities on your prostate. If the thought makes you squirm, you may want to realign your priorities: Regular tests can help catch prostate cancer at an earlier, less hazardous stage and increase the odds of eliminating the disease. If prostate cancer is suspected, your doctor will likely want to schedule a blood test to determine the amount of PSA in your blood, as well as conduct a biopsy.  A prostate biopsy is usually performed by a urologist, who removes samples of tissue from your prostate with a needle and the visual help of a transrectal ultrasound. If cancer is detected, it must then be graded. Grades are assigned to the two areas of the prostate that contain most of the cancerous cells and are added together to obtain a Gleason score. The higher the score, the more aggressive the cancer could be.

How is it treated?

There are several treatment options with which to combat prostate cancer, but some men with the slow-growing variety choose no treatment at all. The term &ldquowatchful waiting&rdquo describes the decision to forgo treatment, but still keep tabs on the cancer. This route is sometimes chosen by older men for whom the treatment&rsquos side effects represent more of a health risk than the cancer itself or by men who don&rsquot want to deal with the possible side effects of treatment. Often, men with slow-growing prostate cancer have about the same life expectancy as those without cancer. If you decide to pursue treatment, you have several options:
  • Radical prostatectomy: Removal of the prostate gland can be a very effective treatment option, but having to recuperate for weeks and endure possible side effects like incontinence and impotence causes many men to shy away from it.
  • Radiation: It can be just as effective as RP and the recovery time is shorter, but radiation treatment is also linked to impotence.
  • Hormone therapy: Lowering testosterone levels can slow the progression of some forms of prostate cancer and help manage aggressive forms of the disease.
  • Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy drugs are often used to treat men with advanced prostate cancer.
  • Cryotherapy: It's a relatively new treatment with a space-age name, but cryotherapy actually consists in freezing -- and hopefully destroying -- cancerous cells.
  •  High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU): The opposite of cryotherapy, HIFU uses a high-intensity ultrasound beam to heat the cancerous prostate cells until they die.
    The Prostate - Diagram

Prevention is key

Prevention

Current information on prostate cancer risk factors suggests that some cases might be prevented. One possible risk factor that can be changed is diet. You may be able to reduce your risk of prostate cancer by eating a diet low in fat and high in vegetables, fruits, and grains. The American Cancer Society recommends limiting your intake of high-fat foods from animal sources and choosing most of the foods you eat from plant sources. Eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables each day. Bread, cereals, grain products, rice, pasta, and beans are also recommended. These guidelines on nutrition may also lower the risk for some other types of cancer. Tomatoes (raw, cooked, or in tomato products such as sauces or ketchup), grapefruit, and watermelon are rich in lycopenes. These vitamin-like substances are antioxidants that help prevent damage to DNA and may help lower prostate cancer risk. Taking vitamin supplements may affect your prostate cancer risk. Some studies suggest that taking 50 milligrams of vitamin E daily can lower risk. Although other studies found vitamin E to be of no benefit, reasonable doses of this vitamin have no significant side effects and are not expensive. On the other hand, vitamin A supplements may actually increase prostate cancer risk. As always, you should use vitamin supplements with caution. Because the exact cause of prostate cancer is not known, we do not know if it is possible to prevent most cases of the disease. Many risk factors such as a man's age, race, and family history are beyond his control. The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial is a study that has enrolled more than 18,000 men to determine whether a drug called finasteride, which prevents the prostate from using male hormones, can reduce prostate cancer risk. Androgens are male hormones that are known to be important in promoting the growth of normal and cancerous prostate cells and may be important in the development of prostate cancers. Because prostate cancers form slowly, it will take several years before we know. The same mantra you hear about many cancers also applies to prostate cancer: Early detection can play a key role in its control and elimination. That's why it's important not to let your squeamishness get the best of you; relax and get the test over with. Regular prostate exams, along with knowing the steps you can take to prevent this disease, will go a long way in keeping your prostate health on the right track.

Is there sex after prostate cancer?

Although the diagnosis of prostate cancer is devastating, the disease is highly treatable. Treatment, however, does have side effects that can drastically affect sexual function both from a physiologic and psychological standpoint. Younger men, men with less extensive prostate cancer and those who have had an active sex life before developing prostate cancer are less likely to experience difficulties with sexual function after cancer treatment. Communication between sexual partners and physicians is also crucial for dealing with alterations of sexual function. Sex with another man did not cause the prostate cancer and it will not cause it to return. Will I have sex again? is not an easy question for a doctor to answer because it depends on a multitude of factors. Hopefully one&rsquos doctor will have raised the issue before treatment&mdasheven if the patient did not. But still, discussing sex with one&rsquos doctor early on may not offer much solace when trying to &lsquoget it up&rdquo that first time after treatment for prostate cancer has occurred. Treatment for prostate cancer affects sexual function for two important reasons: The prostate contributes the bulk of the fluid that makes up semen; so depending on which of the two major treatments for prostate cancer a man chooses, he may discovered that he has little to no ejaculate at all after treatment. Second, the nerves that stimulate the penis to become erect run close-by the prostate gland. They too can be affected by cancer treatment. In addition, anal sex, which may be an integral part of a gay man&rsquos sex life, may also be affected by certain treatments for prostate cancer. Sexual function can depend greatly whether or not the treatment was surgery or radiation therapy. It is best to discuss the various issues specific to each treatment.

Radical Prostatectomy

Surgical treatment for prostate cancer is called a &lsquoradical prostatectomy.&rdquo The surgery removes the entire prostate gland and some surrounding tissue. The doctor tries to spare the nerves that stimulate an erection, but sometimes nerve injury cannot be avoided as the surgeon tries primarily to cure the cancer (Jelsing, 1999). Most men notice significant change in erections even after what is called &ldquonerve sparring&rdquo surgery. It can take as long as two years for erections to stabilize.

Inability to ejaculate

The other universal complication after radical prostatectomy is failure to ejaculate. When the surgeon removes a man&rsquos prostate, the muscle that closes his bladder allowing his ejaculate to move out of the penis rather than back into his bladder is destroyed. Instead of shooting out, his ejaculation becomes &ldquoretrograde&rdquo and shoots into his bladder. While still perfectly capable of having an orgasm, no ejaculate comes out. This can be a very troubling complication of surgery for some men and their sexual partners. Some men feel that they are not really sexually satisfied if nothing comes out. They may also feel less manly. Semen itself is erotic for many gay men. They like to see it, feel it and taste it. Retrograde ejaculation can rob them of this very important stimulant. Fortunately, radical prostate surgery does not affect the anus or rectum. Once the patient gets over the pain from surgery and the incision fully heals, he will be able to have anal sex again without restriction. Anal sex did not cause the prostate cancer not will it cause it to come back. If you have any queries, please consult your local GP. Combined sources Jamaica Cancer Society Malecare Fighting Cancer Together

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Bisexuality Day is September 23 ...................

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Celebrate Bisexuality Day is observed on September 23 maybe 24th as it falls on a Sunday by members of the bisexual community and their supporters originally in the United States but has been extended worldwide.

This day is a call for bisexual, pansexual, friends and supporters to recognize and celebrate bisexuality, bisexual history, bisexual community and culture, and the bi/pansexual people in their lives.
First observed in 1999, Celebrate Bisexuality Day is the brainchild of three United Statesbisexual rights activists: Wendy Curry of Maine, Michael Page of Florida, and Gigi Raven Wilburof Texas.

Wilbur said,


Ever since the Stonewall rebellion, the gay and lesbian community has grown in strength and visibility. The bisexual community also has grown in strength but in many ways we are still invisible. I too have been conditioned by society to automatically label a couple walking hand in hand as either straight or gay, depending upon the perceived gender of each person.


This celebration of bisexuality in particular, as opposed to general LGBT events, was conceived as a response to the prejudice and marginalization of the bisexual persons by some in both thestraight and greater LGBT communities.

In its first year, an observance was held during the International Lesbian and Gay Association, which occurred during the week of the 23rd. While at first it only took hold in areas with an extremely strong bisexual presence, it is now celebrated worldwide.

It features event such as discussions, dinner parties and dances in Toronto and a large masquerade ball in Queensland, Australia. At Texas A&M University, the week featured discussion panels and question-and-answer sessions. Princeton University celebrates this day each year by throwing a party at its LGBT Center.

It has also been celebrated in Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden and the United Kingdom.






Unfortunately in Jamaica either our advocates haven't matured to the recognition of bisexuals as a part of our struggle or we can't be bothered as "batty business" and the associated dramas are more important when some of the very issues of homophobia as we call it are not really so but bi-phobia if one were to closely examine the details at times.




JFLAG, Jamaica Forum for Lesbians Allsexuals and Gays has "Allsexuals" included in their acronym I suppose to cover all other orientations and variants outside of the original LGBT population (excuding thoses associated with disorders) but I never heard of any direct meetings, interventions or strategies to engage this section of the population or any inclusion in the umpteen public statements or press releases.

Bi-phobia or bi-erasure by default?





I would hate to think that our advocacy representatives are themselves guilty of bi-phobia in the form of bisexual erasure (the tendency to ignore, omit, remove, falsify, or reexplain evidence of bisexuality in history, advocacy, academia, the news media, and other primary sources.


In its most extreme form, bisexual erasure can include denying that bisexuality exists. Inclusiveness is the name of the game now if we are to get anywhere but with the elitist position taken by the group one wonders when will we begin to move on anything? with recent ugly events further darkening our LGBT history that of aloofness towards the homeless msm population more and more persons in and outside the LGBT community are asking what are the reasons for these organizations.

It is refreshing to see other individual voices saying their piece and going out on their own, I would love to see an all out Jamaican bisexual website or at the very least a couple of blogs related to bisexual issues exclusively. There has been some discourse regarding bisexuality but the backlash from the MSM and SGL female communities suggests we have a far way to go towards inclusiveness and tolerance, ways that are to be facilitated by a JFLAG or similar groups.

Let us hope in the near future something can be done about that either by them despite the insulation or some other group, organization or individuals. Here is an ironical take on the issue from a UK perspective, the images included here were burrowed from this clip.


video





Celebrate yourselves anyway my BI-FRIENDS. We won't erase you here.

my audio commentary on the issue from a year ago:










 Bi-phobia by default from supposed LGBT advocate structures? 


Also see:



Biphobia in the L & G communities maybe higher than thought from last year.

Peace and tolerance

H

School Is Cool - No Problems With Homosexuality

0 comments

Following the recent uproar about lesbianism in schools and such here comes another article on the schools issue interestingly the Principals Association President has come up for mention.

Here is the article as appearing in the Gleaner recently:

Latoya Grindley, Gleaner Staff Reporter

THE ISSUE of homosexual activities in secondary schools has risen to the forefront as one of the behavioural problems confronting school officials. There has been much debate over time, whether co-educational schools are more wholesome for children than same-sex institutions. 

In this regard, many parents have also expressed concerns about their children's exposure to homosexuality in schools, and have carefully selected which school their children attend.


While trying to give some reassurance that homosexual engagements in schools are currently no cause for concern, president of the Jamaica Association of Principals of Secondary Schools, Sharon Reid, said the issue really is how the incidents are treated.

According to her, homosexuality, like bullyism, is just one of the behavioural problems that schools will inevitably face.

"Every school will have these problems but, as educators, we have to be careful how we deal with an issue like that and how we manage it."

Recognising that homosexuality has become more obvious in schools nowadays, Reid, who also serves as the principal of St Andrew High School for Girls, said the behaviour could be due to external influences.

"There is heightened interest because of what is happening in the world and the pressures from gay movements," she said, adding that the association is informing members on how best the issue of homosexuality can be dealt with.

Specifically, as it relates to the school she heads, the principal noted that the student handbook speaks to student intimacy. "The handbook points directly to abstinence and forbids student intimacy. As a Christian school, our students are urged to practise abstinence," she stressed.

To adequately deal with dysfunctional behaviour at the institution, Reid noted the importance of guidance counsellors. "We have guidance programmes which allow for discussions and reinforcement. And if at any time we have any information that a child is involved in certain activities, the parents will be called in."

She also emphasised the importance of educators being aware of issues affecting students and to be prepared to effectively deal with them.

"As educators, we have to inform ourselves, be alert as it relates to the changes around us and recognise the pressures affecting children. We have to be prepared to inform our students and be prepared to work with them."

Admitting that there are cases in which students are said to be involved in homosexual activities in schools, immediate past president of the Jamaica Teachers' Association, Paul Adams, indicated that each school has its unique way of dealing with these situations.

"There have been ongoing discussions between the Jamaica Teachers' Association and the Ministry of Education on the matter and if there is an interpretation that this is happening, we urge schools to take the necessary actions to protect children," he said.

Admitting that this is a sensitive issue, he said that educators have to be very careful how students are addressed and reprimanded. "We have to be careful so that we don't brand people's children. You won't find a policy specific to this kind of behaviour, but schools have to put in measures to stop any form of sexual activity whether normal or otherwise."

He has also urged parents to play their part in the event that their child is engaging in deviant activities or is being targeted. "If you have information that children are affected or targeted, you must first of all visit the school. Parents should express concern and this will facilitate an investigation."

latoya.grindley@gleanerjm.com

for a historical perspective go HERE:


Principal Association to address "lesbian issue" in prominent high school


Lesbians & Learning – Situational Homosexuality at a Kgn All Girls School ?

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Urgent Need to discuss sex & sexuality II

Following a cowardly decision by the Minister(try) of Education to withdraw an all important Health Family Life, HFLE Manual on sex and sexuality I examine the possible reasons why we have the homo-negative challenges on the backdrop of a missing multi-generational understanding of sexuality and the focus on sexual reproductive activity in the curriculum.

Newstalk 93FM's Issues On Fire: Polygamy Should Be Legalized In Jamaica 08.04.14



debate by hosts and UWI students on the weekly program Issues on Fire on legalizing polygamy with Jamaica's multiple partner cultural norms this debate is timely.

Also with recent public discourse on polyamorous relationships, threesomes (FAME FM Uncensored) and on social.

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What do you think is the most important area of HIV treatment research today?

Do you think Lesbians could use their tolerance advantage to help push for gay rights in Jamaica??

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide a 2009 Word focus report where the history of the major explosion of homeless MSM occurred and references to the party DVD that was leaked to the bootleg market which exposed many unsuspecting patrons to the public (3:59), also the caustic remarks made by former member of Parliament in the then JLP administration. The agencies at the time were also highlighted and the homo negative and homophobic violence met by ordinary Jamaican same gender loving men. The late founder of the CVC, former ED of JASL and JFLAG Dr. Robert Carr was also interviewed. At 4:42 that MSM was still homeless to 2012 but has managed to eek out a living but being ever so cautious as his face is recognizable from the exposed party DVD, he has been slowly making his way to recovery despite the very slow pace

Thanks for your Donations

Hello readers,

thank you for your donations via Paypal in helping to keep this blog going, my limited frontline community work, temporary shelter assistance at my home and related costs. Please continue to support me and my allies in this venture that has now become a full time activity. When I first started blogging in late 2007 it was just as a pass time to highlight GLBTQ issues in Jamaica under then JFLAG's blogspot page but now clearly there is a need for more forumatic activity which I want to continue to play my part while raising more real life issues pertinent to us.

Donations presently are accepted via Paypal where buttons are placed at points on this blog(immediately below, GLBTQJA (Blogspot), GLBTQJA (Wordpress) and the Gay Jamaica Watch's blog as well. If you wish to send donations otherwise please contact: glbtqjamaica@live.com




Activities & Plans: ongoing and future

  • To continue this venture towards website development with an E-zine focus

  • Work with other Non Governmental organizations old and new towards similar focus and objectives

  • To find common ground on issues affecting GLBTQ and straight friendly persons in Jamaica towards tolerance and harmony

  • Exposing homophobic activities and suggesting corrective solutions

  • To formalise GLBTQ Jamaica's activities in the long term

  • Continuing discussion on issues affecting GLBTQ people in Jamaica and elsewhere

  • Welcoming, examining and implemeting suggestions and ideas from you the viewing public

  • Present issues on HIV/AIDS related matters in a timely and accurate manner

  • Assist where possible victims of homophobic violence and abuse financially, temporary shelter(my home) and otherwise

  • Track human rights issues in general with a view to support for ALL

Thanks again
Mr. H

Tel: 1-876-8134942
lgbtevent@gmail.com








Peace

Information & Disclaimer

lgbtevent@gmail.com

Individuals who are mentioned or whose photographs appear on this site are not necessarily Homosexual, HIV positive or have AIDS.

This blog contains pictures that may be disturbing. We have taken the liberty to present these images as evidence of the numerous accounts of homophobic violence meted out to alledged gays in Jamaica.

Faces and names witheld for the victims' protection.

This blog not only watches and covers LGBTQ issues in Jamaica and elsewhere but also general human rights and current affairs where applicable.

This blog contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences.

If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please view labels, post list or exit.

Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics.

This blog is not designed to provide medical care, if you are ill, please seek medical advice from a licensed practioner

Thanks so much for your kind donations and thoughts.

As for some posts, they contain enclosure links to articles, blogs and or sites for your perusal, use the snapshot feature to preview by pointing the cursor at the item(s) of interest. Such item(s) have a small white dialogue box icon appearing to their top right hand side.


Recent Homophobic Incidents
CLICK HERE for related posts/labels and HERE from the gayjamaicawatch's BLOG containing information I am aware of. If you know of any such reports or incidents please contact lgbtevent@gmail.com

Peace to you and be safe out there.

Love.

What to do if you are attacked (News You Can Use)

First, be calm: Do not panic; it may be very difficult to maintain composure if attacked but this is important.

Try to reason with the attacker: Establish communication with the person. This takes a lot of courage. However, a conversation may change the intention of an attacker.

Do not try anything foolish: If you know outmanoeuvring the attacker is impossible, do not try it.

Do not appear to be afraid: Look the attacker in the eye and demonstrate that you are not fearful.

This may have a psychological effect on the individual.

Emergency numbers
The police 119

Kingfish 811

Crime Stop 311


Steps to Take When Contronted or Arrested by Police

a) Ask to see a lawyer or Duty Council

b) Only give name and address and no other information until a lawyer is present to assist

c) Try to be polite even if the scenario is tensed) Don’t do anything to aggravate the situation

e) Every complaint lodged at a police station should be filed and a receipt produced, this is not a legal requirement but an administrative one for the police to track reports

f) Never sign to a statement other than the one produced by you in the presence of the officer(s)

g) Try to capture a recording of the exchange or incident or call someone so they can hear what occurs, place on speed dial important numbers or text someone as soon as possible

h) File a civil suit if you feel your rights have been violatedi) When making a statement to the police have all or most of the facts and details together for e.g. "a car" vs. "the car" represents two different descriptions

j) Avoid having the police writing the statement on your behalf except incases of injuries, make sure what you want to say is recorded carefully, ask for a copy if it means that you have to return for it

Sexual Health / STDs News From Medical News Today

This Day in History