Do you think the Buggery Law should be?

The Safe House Homeless LGBTQ Project 2009 a detailed look & more


In response to numerous requests for more information on the defunct Safe House Pilot Project that was to address the growing numbers of displaced and homeless LGBTQ youth in Kingston in 2007/8/9, a review of the relevance of the project as a solution, the possible avoidance of present issues with some of its previous residents if it were kept open.
Recorded June 12, 2013; also see from the former Executive Director named in the podcast more background on the project: HERE also see the beginning of the issues from the closure of the project: The Quietus ……… The Safe House Project Closes and The Ultimatum on December 30, 2009

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Bounty Killer and his B****man comments at Shaggy’s fundraiser

2 comments

The media has been touting Rodney Price aka Bounty Killer’s obviously third party written apology after he made a mess of things at Shaggy and Friends 2010 concert at Jamaica House on January 2, 2010. He was apparently called on stage by his “entertainment son” and surprise act Mavado who himself has a couple of anti gay songs chief among them one entitled “Dem a Fag” (They are fags) which describes effeminate looking men with bleached faces as gays in the dancehall community and other things.

The aim of the Shaggy and Friends 2010 event according to Shaggy in a recent radio interview was to raise funds for a young girl who was at a children’s facility who needed dialysis treatment, he visited the facility and saw the need was much greater so he took on the task of using his celebrity to bring attention to the cause. The incident left a bitter taste in the audiences mouth according to press sound bites, articles and a friend who happened to have attended the pricy ticketed event many politicians were present were in for a treat when Bounty Killer upon entering the stage lashed out used words such as “Battyman” hinting that they were unmarried persons in the venue without children and that those who didn’t donate were “Battyman” apparently trying to juxtapose that they wouldn’t understand the needs of children or care for them. It has been described elsewhere as a most awful event as patrons in the venue went numb some literally with jaws dropped as they couldn’t believe what they were hearing from the artist whose set also included a raft of expletives (Jamaican bad words or colourful language) at one point.

Clearly this is a perception held by many Jamaicans that unmarried single men, especially professionals are gay and I feel this incident should not be taken lightly simply because Bounty Killer apologized. His apology could just be seen as a public relations stunt as the deed has already been done. This seems to be a well timed and premeditated action by Bounty KILLER as he must have known being invited by Shaggy what the reason for the cause was and the fact that the venue (Jamaica House, the Prime Minister’s official office and residence) calls for a certain amount of decorum. One radio commentator hinted that maybe because certain politicians were present why he did so or it could be a swipe at Shaggy himself who was clearly distraught by the incident, if that is so then this is really unfortunate. There were patrons in the audience who enjoyed the fiasco by the way.

Was it a way to protest Buju Banton’s arrest and the perception of him being “set up” by gays in the US?

According to many publications and surprisingly including The Star News whose editorials before now seem to support this kind of charade, persons were very upset by this act from Bounty Killer that marred an otherwise very good event at the end of the holiday season. In an article entitled Bounty Apologizes for his ‘behaviour’ at Shaggy’s show in the Star News dated January 4th a press release from Bounty Killer was quoted

“I’ve learn to choose my battles wisely and the grounds upon which to fight them. I’ve also learnt when to admit I didn’t choose my ground wisely and Saturday night’s show was one of those occasions.” According to him he said he got caught up in the moment as he had an audience he doesn’t normally have including politicians and persons from the upper echelons of society.

So it seems they are all Battyman then Mr. Pryce?

He performed his infamous 1997 antigay song “Eagle and the Hawk” (Battyman nuh want dem around mi) translation = eagle and the hawks are guns and as for gays he doesn’t want them around him so in essence the guns are to kill gays.

He continued by saying “nuff a dem a battyman dats why dem nuh have nuh pickney” (a lot of them (them meaning politicians and powerful people in this context) are gay that’s why they have no children)

The song was originally written back in the day to counter other rival dancehall DJs at the time with which he had feuds chief among them being the person on Beenieman, for years the two clashed for dominance in the dancehall arena, however the song has since taken a new meaning to throw hate at gays in general and incite death via the gun.

Well Mr. Price my question is after all these years in the dancehall music business and you, trying in some instances to become a peacemaker in and at other major events where other DJs have feuded this incident was where you now learn where to choose your battles?

Please I don’t buy it, clearly this was a press release penned by a Public Relations or an A& R (Artistry and Repertoire) publicist person from his management team or a hired firm for him. Mr. Pryce is not known to be so well versed in the English language as he is teased continuously by public commentators and radio broadcasters alike often parodied for fun. He knows fully well that the word Battyman and songs of that inciteful nature are NOT allowed to be PUBLICLY performed on stage and is clearly a breach of many laws including his use of indecent language of which he could have been arrested. Also it could be looked from international circles as breach of the RCA, Reggae Compassionate Act of which he was said to have signed in the United Kingdom to desist from such performances so as to be allowed entry in that country and in the European Union for performances and relevant work permits as was pushed by the Stop Murder Music campaign in that part of the world.

Let’s see if he has really learnt as he hints from this as he ended the press release by apologizing to Shaggy, sponsors, benefactors and all in attendance who were offended by his performance. He then apparently made a pledge of $250,000 which I feel Shaggy should NOT accept, they should send him away with his money and foul mouth.

Friends and readers make up your own mind on this issue.

Peace and tolerance.

H

Monday, January 4, 2010

Mi can't stop cry fi Buju says Carolyn Cooper in the Gleaner

3 comments
Carolyn Cooper,

I was one of those black women who immediately got upset with Buju Banton over his browning: "Mi love mi car, mi love mi bike, mi love mi money an ting/But most of all mi love mi browning." Quick to dismiss the youthful DJ as just the typical Jamaican man hung up on light skin, we let him have it.

After the first wave of vexation passed, we took consolation in the fact that we actually didn't want to be just one of a string of objects, however beloved. The unfortunate rhyming of the all-inclusive 'ting' and 'browning' reinforced the sense of the woman as mere commodity.

It took me quite a long time to emancipate myself from mental slavery and admit that the song wasn't simply a generic celebration of brownness as distinct from, and superior to, blackness. Buju was really singing the praises of a particular browning, his Lorna. Even more to the point, what Buju explicitly valued about Lorna was not her colour at all. It was her faith in his unquestionable love despite all the planning and scheming and conning of "di old viper dem - Pamela and Dawn, Suzette and Karen" - who were packing up her head with doubts about his integrity. Lorna stubbornly refused to listen.

Sensitive to the negativity the song provoked, Buju tried to do damage control: "Mi can't stop cry fi all black woman/nuff tings a gwaan fi unu complexion." Buju tried his best to kiss and make up. But we didn't want any condescending tears of sympathy: "Nothing no wrong wid wi, so wi no waan nobody sorry fi wi." Poor Buju: damned if he did and damned if he didn't. He was caught in a vice.

'Rastaman at di control'

These days, Buju Banton is literally imprisoned in the United States penal colony, charged with possession of cocaine with the intent to distribute. I don't want to believe a word of it. I've deliberately not read the damning affidavit because I'm like Lorna on this one: :All di rumour di informer dem a spread me just not listening."

I'm the first to admit that I am totally prejudiced in favour of Buju Banton's innocence. Completely. Irrationally. I've made a pre-judgement and I don't want any 'facts' to confuse the issue. Even if I were to see the video of the knife-licking, I would refuse to believe the evidence of my own eyes. In this instance, faith is not the substance of things hoped for or the evidence of things not seen. It is hope that there is no evidence that Buju was dealing in the substance.

The Mark Myrie I think I know is an honourable man. I've visited his Gargamel studio on more than one occasion and sat in on the reasonings that flow freely in the yard. The day I went to confirm arrangements for the launch of his Rasta Got Soul album at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, in April last year, I got caught up for more than three hours in philosophical conversation on the meaning of life. 'Yu done know how Rastaman love fi reason - especially when dem got soul.'

And on that score, I must big up Dr Leahcim Semaj for lifting the level of talk radio in Jamaica over the last few months with his 'reasoning' programme. It is so inspiring to listen to an 'upful' public intellectual who is in touch with the masses of the people and yet doesn't think he needs to talk down to us to be popular. I also have to give 'nuff respects' to Mutabaruka for his brilliant new TV show. 'Two Rastaman at di control.' How things and times have changed in Jamaica!

'Hills and Valleys'

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the publication by the Institute of Social and Economic Research at UWI, Mona, of the Report on the Ras Tafari Movement in Kingston, Jamaica, written by Rex Nettleford, Roy Augier and M.G. Smith. On the recommendation of yet another rastaman at the control, Dr Jalani Niaah of the UWI will host an international conference to acknowledge the anniversary: 'Negotiating the African Presence: Rastafari Livity and Scholarship'. The date of this historic conference, August 17-20, was chosen to celebrate the birthday of Marcus Garvey whose vision of African redemption is so central to the Rastafari movement.

A foundational theme in Rastafari philosophy is repatriation to Africa, whether physically or ideologically. Buju Banton's Hills and Valleys is a powerful evocation of this desire to return to ancestral homelands. In his present state of imprisonment 'a farin', the insistently repetitive lyrics are heartbreaking:

It hard, it hard, it hard

Let them know we waan go

home a we yard

It hard, it hard, it hard

Oh God, we waan go home!

Marcus Garvey offers Buju stern advice in the introduction to his poem 'The Tragedy of White Injustice': "The object I have in view is to get the Negro to accomplish much for himself out of his own thoughtfulness. To arouse that thoughtfulness, he must be shocked or otherwise he must be driven to see the unusual that is operating against him, and so this little pamphlet was written during a time of leisure in jail in 1927."

Buju's shocking imprisonment gives him the 'leisure' to reflect on his folly in mixing up himself with the wrong crowd; or worse, being guilty as charged - a possibility I do concede in moments of rationality. All the same, mi naa stop cry fi di Gargamel 'til im step outa Babylon prison an come back a yard.

Carolyn Cooper is professor of literary and cultural studies at the University of the West Indies, Mona. Send feedback to: karokupa@gmail.com or columns@gleanerjm.com.

2009, The Year that was .......

0 comments
2009 is easily one of the most active years in our recent lgbt history, we saw many new developments mostly negative on our scene and an unprecedented public education campaign as it were by the media in both print and audio/visual formats on gay issues thus giving us very high visibility. Homophobic as well as gay on gay violence increased dramatically than previous years and deaths due to both also saw a shocking corresponding increase as well. Most of the more prominent cases that have come to light are still under investigation and as feared may never get solved despite the prominence of some of the victims involved, such is the nature of our police and justice investigatory arms.

The lesbian community specifically saw a continued onslaught of homophobic incidents with the so described and disturbing “Corrective Rape” cases continuing from 2008. We saw allegedly 5 cases in 2008 and a further 4 for 2009 with one couple who had relocated from another parish to restart their lives due to a previous homophobic attack of a different nature falling victims to this awful scourge.

Homophobic and related incidents
Gay persons murdered in 2009 rose to 7 from 4 in 2008 according to my information here with of course the three more prominent cases being that of British Ambassador Mr. John Terry, the founder of the adult entertainment website Rudejam who was found dead in his apartment in December 2009 with several stab wounds and the operator of Café Aubegine who was found with his throat slashed at his Mona address. Arrests have been made by the Police on the first and third cases aforementioned that of Mr. John Terry but the case stalled late in 2009 and should recommence in 2010. The alleged male tenant of the home of the restaurateur was arrested after evidence pointed to him having blood from the deceased on his hands, in his defense he has said he tried to stop the bleeding of the victim after hearing cries for help and arriving in the bedroom to find him on the floor with his throat slashed open, he used his hands to try to slow down the hemorrhaging.
The general public’s belief that the violence meted to gays are done by other gay persons has left an air of sinicism about the cases mentioned above so the interest in having them solved has waned greatly and they are overlooked in a sense by the relevant authorities or the pace has dramatically slowed as other societal issues take precedence.

Community based violence also increased in my estimation just by the reports with the two most prominent being the house attack in South Central Jamaica where a lovers quarrel ended up with a mob called in by one of the persons involved alleging that the other was gay and leaving the victim with bruises all over and the loss of personal items. The other very public gouging of the eye incident that has been followed closely by the mainstream media especially the Jamaica Observer, the accused has since been bailed and the trial continues despite the victim’s call the drop the charges and discontinuing the case which could not be done as the presiding judge explained that seeing a police report was filed and things set in motion that could not be undone. Other small skirmishes occurred but were not of major significance and the entertainment scene saw a leveling off of fights and incidents much to the delight of party goers.

Interventions/agitation
Social support and other similar activities from the sole formal GLTBQ organization JFLAG waned significantly, the usual press release followed major incidents and commentary in the respective print media however many persons specifically the homeless MSM problem which came to a head in 2008 – 9 left an ugly scar on the landscape with controversy surrounding the snap resignation of the Jamaica AIDS Support for Life’s Executive Director due to a housing project meltdown and the decision by the NGO’s board to discontinue the activities with this group which included a safe house of sorts operated on the property. (See post following this) It is not yet clear as to JFLAG’s position on this issue as they have been mum as expected on the matter.
There seems to be a fear that issues must be kept secret from the rest of the community on general matters of interest. The ED of JASL at the time of this post was said to be travelling and could not be reached for comment. The homeless MSM saga became a sticky issue due to the lack of funds as said by JFLAG to adequately address the persons who fall in this category, it was the ED’s involvement in this matter that saw an upturn in the HIV/AIDS, behavior change intervention within the community and the impact was felt island wide however many are doubtful now and upset at the turn of events with mistrust re-emerging in as far as accessing testing/treatment services. This sensitive matter is being watched closely by ordinary gays on the ground as well as others in international circles including funders and concerned Jamaicans living abroad. Questions are being raised as to why it took JASL to do that kind of activity and not JFLAG fully?

Jamaican dancehall artists came under intense pressure and scrutiny from overseas GLBTQ groups specifically in the EU and the United States with emphasis under the Stop Murder Music campaign and similar typed activism. Many artists were blocked from entering countries and cities like Canada, The US (San Francisco, Miami, Los Angeles), Luxemburg, Grenada, Barbados, Trinidad, and Copenhagen to name a few. Mr. Mark Myrie aka Buju Banton of course made headlines from as early as June 2008 when his CD launch and subsequent tour dates were announced. He faced protests and a hazing incident at one of his concerts in Los Angeles over his lyrics in the song “Boom Bye Bye” (Inna Battyboi head) that advocated death by shooting etc on gay men. He eventually met with a group in San Francisco to work out a supposed compromise which turned out to be a public relations stunt to avoid further cancellations of his tour dates in the US which was bleeding millions of dollars. The lack of support from other dancehall acts openly was telling as it seems many were afraid of the impact it may have had on their careers and earnings from tours and CD sales if a backlash should occur.

The lack of support from the Jamaican GLTBQ community was also telling as the cancel Buju Banton website formed by a key player in the campaign has brought to bear that very few Jamaicans registered to be a part of the agitation from our supporters up north.

His subsequent arrest by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in December on alleged cocaine trafficking charges in Florida was linked by some as a “set up” by the powerful gay lobby who are using the issue to destroy his career. As it has now turned out both issues are unrelated and public support which was strong for him at first has down died down tremendously. JFLAG had tried to diffuse the rumour mill by publishing a letter to the Jamaica Observer and radio interviews on same.

Asylum seekers and professionals left in greater numbers in 2009 that probably any other time in our recent history as persons were distraught by the conditions they had to endure from bias to fear of violence in their communities. Others left because of economic reasons to pursue better opportunities in work and study. JFLAG and Women for Women lost its Co-chair and Chair respectively (one individual) in this grouping as well. Many took the opportunity to use the favourable asylum policies of some EU states in as far as homophobic threat was concerned and have been assimilating in the respective countries. It is hoped that links can be forged with those abroad to better agitate for rights based issues here at home and their financial support would be indeed welcomed. In trying to track the numbers it is estimated that more than 23 persons have taken the move some reluctantly as the possibility of return is not anytime soon, it is not yet known if JFLAG has a head count for this year or if they have been tracking it closely as some persons access them for information of the procedures necessary.

Legal Issues
As it relates to law we saw the passing of the revised Sexual Offences Bill with the deliberate exclusion of gender and sexual orientation discrimination clauses removed after vigorous debate and lobby from the anti gay establishment chief among them Lawyers Christian Fellowship/Council led by chief homophobe Atty-at-Law Ms Shirley Richards.
There were no submissions from the gay lobby during this crucial debate along with the Charter of Rights roster as well. The government capitulated to this move by the group in a bid to sure up political mileage and pushed the well timed “No to Gay Marriage” smoke screen launched by Prime Minister Golding just before the US President Obama signed their version of the Act to make it a federal offence for crimes against persons due to sexual orientation and gender discrimination playing with public sentiments on homosexuality in general. The gay community in Jamaica never asked for gay marriage rights during the Charter’s or SOB debates. It seemed to have worked as we have been overlooked in both pieces of legislation.

The Charter of Rights in the meantime was passed in the upper house and has been sent back to the lower house for ratification within some days time (normally 60 days or so) it should be debated there again possibly gazzetted and sent back to the upper house for final passage. Sadly very little was done in the community to sensitize persons on the importance of such a Charter and the possible implications it may have on the Buggery Act and specifically male homosexual sex in general. The government is intent it seems on a theocracy becoming moral dictators for private citizens’ decisions.

Media landscape
Nearly all mediums of media had a thing or two to say or publish in 2009 on GLBTQ issues but in fairness most of the publications were fair and some even went as far as to examine Jamaica’s homophobic problem, strong articles by commentators such as Ian Boyne, John Maxwell and Martin Henry were crucial in that examination.
The juxtaposing of religion, sexuality and gender issues were refreshingly good to see coming from the aforementioned as prior t recent times their writings were somewhat of a biased nature. What was clearly lacking was the standpoint of the gay community on a whole and this is where JFLAG has been faulted for not adequately having a pubic presence except for the occasional letter to the editor and second hand reporting by journalists on conversations held with persons within the group, they came for heavy criticism yet again by the community for the poor editorial condition of their website and seeming lack of engagement with the GLBTQ community. Although there were negative letters, articles and editorials as well in some print media and gossip tabloids (notably the Xnews and Observer Chat) the strong articles helped to bring balance to the scene and the editors of the respective papers and news rooms clearly are realizing that people can’t be led anymore and that the issues are being looked at with more scrutiny. There is still more interest that needs to come from the gay community.

JLFAG presence on radio was light in 2009 in discussing issues such as the Buju Banton arrest in December, the John Terry murder case and the San Francisco protest of Buju Banton’s album tour.

One ugly media moment was the now infamous Raggashanti interview of an alleged drag queen who was arrested by Police in Central Jamaica after herself and a man were caught in a compromising position in a car in a public place. The police soon realized he was a cross dresser and the story made headlines. The Observer Chat carried a full photo of the assumed cross dresser and insinuated that the members of the Police were allegedly courting her for sexual favours. The exchange was irritating for some and many were very upset at the Chat’s article which named JFLAG in an alleged telephone interview saying that she was OK and never suffered any harm following the media’s interest in the story and the television footage. The mother paper to the Chat, The Jamaica Observer was however irresponsible in it’s handling of this story and published full face photos of the cross dresser.
Transgenderism was highlighted in a piece in the Jamaica Observer and its impact from dancehall culture, media in general has been slowly playing catch up on this issue as the public’s understanding and that of the gay community’s tolerance is still far behind.

Outlook and possible hot beds for 2010
All in all 2010 is already a dramatic year generally for our nation with the present economic woes facing us and the fledgling IMF deal the administration is trying to pin down with a letter of intent. The john Terry, Rudejam Founder and Restaurateur murders are to be watched closely this year as the respective trials and investigations proceed.
The Homeless MSM situation at Jamaica AIDS Support for Life and its outcome are also of concern. It is hoped that there will be some compromise reached between the Board and the Executive Director who has tendered her resignation or maybe a new organization formed to deal with the issue of these men who clearly need all the support possible at this time. She is known to have powerful connections to funders having herself worked with major agencies in her tenure elsewhere, details of these possible new initiatives are being held close to the chests of those involved but if it comes to fruition let us hope that it may serve the men in the group for their development.
The intervention strategies by JFLAG, The Ministry of Health in as far as HIV/AIDS and social support are to be watched too as some funding should be available for this year for them.
Transgender interventions and initiatives are expected and more informative activities such as workshops and seminars are urgently required to bring into focus the widely misunderstood group.

If anything was left out let me know please and thanks.

Here is wishing you all a HAPPY NEW YEAR and thanks for your continued support, comments and suggestions. Please keep on supporting this blog and other similar typed initiatives.

Peace & Tolerance
H
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War of words between pro & anti gay activists on HIV matters .......... what hypocrisy is this?



War of words between pro & anti gay activists on HIV matters .......... what hypocrisy is this?

A war of words has ensued between gay lawyer (AIDSFREEWORLD) Maurice Tomlinson and anti gay activist Dr Wayne West as both accuse each other of lying or being dishonest, when deception has been neatly employed every now and again by all concerned, here is the post from Dr West's blog

This is laughable to me as both gentleman have broken the ethical lines of advocacy respectively repeatedly especially on HIV/AIDS and on legal matters concerning LGBTQ issues

The evidence is overwhelming readers/listeners, you decide.


Urgent Need to discuss sex & sexuality II

Following a cowardly decision by the Minister(try) of Education to withdraw an all important Health Family Life, HFLE Manual on sex and sexuality I examine the possible reasons why we have the homo-negative challenges on the backdrop of a missing multi-generational understanding of sexuality and the focus on sexual reproductive activity in the curriculum.

Calls for Tourism Boycotts are Nonsensical at This Time




(2014 protests New York)


Calling for boycotts by overseas based Jamaican advocates who for the most part are not in touch with our present realities in a real way and do not understand the implications of such calls can only seek to make matters worse than assisting in the struggle, we must learn from, the present economic climate of austerity & tense calm makes it even more sensible that persons be cautious, will these groups assist when there is fallout?, previous experiences from such calls made in 2008 and 2009 and the near diplomatic nightmare that missed us; especially owing to the fact that many of the victims used in the public advocacy of violence were not actual homophobic cases which just makes the ethics of advocacy far less credible than it ought to be.


See more explained HERE from a previous post following the Queen Ifrica matter and how it was mishandled


Newstalk 93FM's Issues On Fire: Polygamy Should Be Legalized In Jamaica 08.04.14



debate by hosts and UWI students on the weekly program Issues on Fire on legalizing polygamy with Jamaica's multiple partner cultural norms this debate is timely.

Also with recent public discourse on polyamorous relationships, threesomes (FAME FM Uncensored) and on social.

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Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide

Violence and venom force gay Jamaicans to hide a 2009 Word focus report where the history of the major explosion of homeless MSM occurred and references to the party DVD that was leaked to the bootleg market which exposed many unsuspecting patrons to the public (3:59), also the caustic remarks made by former member of Parliament in the then JLP administration. The agencies at the time were also highlighted and the homo negative and homophobic violence met by ordinary Jamaican same gender loving men. The late founder of the CVC, former ED of JASL and JFLAG Dr. Robert Carr was also interviewed. At 4:42 that MSM was still homeless to 2012 but has managed to eek out a living but being ever so cautious as his face is recognizable from the exposed party DVD, he has been slowly making his way to recovery despite the very slow pace

Thanks for your Donations

Hello readers,

thank you for your donations via Paypal in helping to keep this blog going, my limited frontline community work, temporary shelter assistance at my home and related costs. Please continue to support me and my allies in this venture that has now become a full time activity. When I first started blogging in late 2007 it was just as a pass time to highlight GLBTQ issues in Jamaica under then JFLAG's blogspot page but now clearly there is a need for more forumatic activity which I want to continue to play my part while raising more real life issues pertinent to us.

Donations presently are accepted via Paypal where buttons are placed at points on this blog(immediately below, GLBTQJA (Blogspot), GLBTQJA (Wordpress) and the Gay Jamaica Watch's blog as well. If you wish to send donations otherwise please contact: glbtqjamaica@live.com




Activities & Plans: ongoing and future

  • To continue this venture towards website development with an E-zine focus

  • Work with other Non Governmental organizations old and new towards similar focus and objectives

  • To find common ground on issues affecting GLBTQ and straight friendly persons in Jamaica towards tolerance and harmony

  • Exposing homophobic activities and suggesting corrective solutions

  • To formalise GLBTQ Jamaica's activities in the long term

  • Continuing discussion on issues affecting GLBTQ people in Jamaica and elsewhere

  • Welcoming, examining and implemeting suggestions and ideas from you the viewing public

  • Present issues on HIV/AIDS related matters in a timely and accurate manner

  • Assist where possible victims of homophobic violence and abuse financially, temporary shelter(my home) and otherwise

  • Track human rights issues in general with a view to support for ALL

Thanks again
Mr. H

Tel: 1-876-8134942
lgbtevent@gmail.com








Peace

Information & Disclaimer

lgbtevent@gmail.com

Individuals who are mentioned or whose photographs appear on this site are not necessarily Homosexual, HIV positive or have AIDS.

This blog contains pictures that may be disturbing. We have taken the liberty to present these images as evidence of the numerous accounts of homophobic violence meted out to alledged gays in Jamaica.

Faces and names witheld for the victims' protection.

This blog not only watches and covers LGBTQ issues in Jamaica and elsewhere but also general human rights and current affairs where applicable.

This blog contains HIV prevention messages that may not be appropriate for all audiences.

If you are not seeking such information or may be offended by such materials, please view labels, post list or exit.

Since HIV infection is spread primarily through sexual practices or by sharing needles, prevention messages and programs may address these topics.

This blog is not designed to provide medical care, if you are ill, please seek medical advice from a licensed practioner

Thanks so much for your kind donations and thoughts.

As for some posts, they contain enclosure links to articles, blogs and or sites for your perusal, use the snapshot feature to preview by pointing the cursor at the item(s) of interest. Such item(s) have a small white dialogue box icon appearing to their top right hand side.


Recent Homophobic Incidents
CLICK HERE for related posts/labels and HERE from the gayjamaicawatch's BLOG containing information I am aware of. If you know of any such reports or incidents please contact lgbtevent@gmail.com

Peace to you and be safe out there.

Love.

What to do if you are attacked (News You Can Use)

First, be calm: Do not panic; it may be very difficult to maintain composure if attacked but this is important.

Try to reason with the attacker: Establish communication with the person. This takes a lot of courage. However, a conversation may change the intention of an attacker.

Do not try anything foolish: If you know outmanoeuvring the attacker is impossible, do not try it.

Do not appear to be afraid: Look the attacker in the eye and demonstrate that you are not fearful.

This may have a psychological effect on the individual.

Emergency numbers
The police 119

Kingfish 811

Crime Stop 311


Steps to Take When Contronted or Arrested by Police

a) Ask to see a lawyer or Duty Council

b) Only give name and address and no other information until a lawyer is present to assist

c) Try to be polite even if the scenario is tensed) Don’t do anything to aggravate the situation

e) Every complaint lodged at a police station should be filed and a receipt produced, this is not a legal requirement but an administrative one for the police to track reports

f) Never sign to a statement other than the one produced by you in the presence of the officer(s)

g) Try to capture a recording of the exchange or incident or call someone so they can hear what occurs, place on speed dial important numbers or text someone as soon as possible

h) File a civil suit if you feel your rights have been violatedi) When making a statement to the police have all or most of the facts and details together for e.g. "a car" vs. "the car" represents two different descriptions

j) Avoid having the police writing the statement on your behalf except incases of injuries, make sure what you want to say is recorded carefully, ask for a copy if it means that you have to return for it

Sexual Health / STDs News From Medical News Today

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